Today's Spotlight

Myopia: Should We Treat It Like a Disease?

Will a lifetime correction of just -2.00D or -3.00D really make a difference in the long run for the patient’s ocular health and quality of life? A close look at the numbers and the host of possible long-term effects suggests the answer is yes. 
Today's Spotlight

Genetics in Eye Care: DNA Leads the Way

Most optometrists approach patient care from a clinical perspective, and rightly so. Direct examination of the eye is straightforward, painless and fruitful. However, breakthroughs in genetics and molecular biology have opened new avenues that begin at the most elemental level: our own DNA. The work of connecting these intrinsic factors to the reality of the patient in the chair is fraught with challenges—scientific, logistical, financial—but holds enormous potential, too. In fact, the first FDA-approved gene therapy was for a retinal degenerative disease. This has sparked significant interest in the role gene therapy plays in eye care, and where it’s headed in the future. 

 
Today's Spotlight

An Unexpected Turn

A 64-year-old Caucasian male presented to the office requesting a second opinion regarding what he described as a constant right eye turn. He explained that he realized the eye was suffering from reduced vision for approximately two years but could not elaborate on how the vision was lost. His motivation for seeking the correction was that he had recently failed the vision test for driving a school bus. 

His ocular history included bilateral upper eyelid ptosis and right exotropia since childhood. He denied a history of double vision. He added that his brother and father have the same upper right eyelid presentation. He reported no systemic illness, no medications and denied allergies of any kind.

Today's Spotlight

Straight to the Point

No optometrist wants to hear the words, “A pencil hit my eye, and now I am in so much pain.” However, everyday accidents do occur, and we have to be prepared when they walk in the door.
Today's Spotlight

A Hazy Shade of Winter

A 56-year-old Hispanic female presented with new-onset hazy vision and floaters in the left eye for the past week. She has had similar episodes in that eye before; the last one occurred six years earlier. In fact, she lost central vision in the left eye almost 20 years ago when the problem first started. The right eye was good, and she reported no problems. She reported being in good health and does not take any medications.

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The News Feed

Look Inside The Current Issue

November 15, 2020

Features

A Modern Approach to Meibomian Gland Dysfunction

Learn how to effectively identify, diagnose and treat this condition.

Artificial Tears: What Matters and Why

When selecting the right drop for your DED patient, experts say the devil’s in the details.

CNS Disease: In the Eye and in Your Chair

These systemic conditions are on the rise, and new research suggests we can catch early signs with an eye exam. Here’s what you need to know.

How to Add Ortho-K to Your Toolkit

This valuable service may require thorough education but will provide enormous benefits to your patients and practice.

How to Answer the “Why?” of Dry Eye

Patients have a lot of questions with this diagnosis, and how you respond is key to achieving positive outcomes.

Lid Wiper Epitheliopathy: What the OD Needs to Know

Observe and assess this aspect of the ocular surface to better deal with dry eye.

Red Eye Remedies: New and Tried-and-True

Eye care providers already have a robust arsenal to help their patients combat this common ocular complaint. Here are the latest additions.

Departments

A Hazy Shade of Winter

Fundus imaging can help reveal a patient’s tumultuous health history.

An Unexpected Turn

Could the comorbid presentation of ptosis and strabismus in this patient indicate a neurological cause?

Caveat Emptor

Another online seller pushes convenience over quality.

DED: A Road Well-Traveled

Here are some tips to help you avoid the potholes I’ve hit along my 20-year journey as a dry eye specialist.

Family is Family

They’re great and all, but they’ll drive you nuts. And you can’t even escape them at the office.

Heart to Heart

Concurrent keratoconus and systemic disease may, or may not, be connected.

Letters to the Editor

Read these optometrists' reactions to one of our recent news stories and a column published over the summer.

New Codes: A Waiting Game

Carriers may not pay yet, but Category III codes are crucial, particularly for a number of new ocular surface procedures

Off to a Bad Start

The timing of surgical intervention for macula-off RD is debateable, and COVID could complicate things further.

Put a Damper on Flareups

Managing acute dry eye looks different every year with new therapy approvals.

Straight to the Point

Ocular trauma must be managed quickly, or else surgical intervention may be deemed necessary.

The Ophthalmic Workhorse

Phenylephrine’s effect on the sympathetic nervous system provides numerous applications far beyond dilation.

E-Newsletters

Practice Pearls

Expert clinician Paul Karpecki, OD, provides practical insights and management strategies for a wide array of ocular conditions.

OCCRS E-Newsletter

A quarterly e-newsletter by Optometric Cornea, Cataract and Refractive Society (OCCRS) covering the latest information on cornea, cataract and refractive surgery, comanagement and leading technologies.

Optometric Retina Society E-Newsletter

Keep up to date on the latest research and clinical findings in retinal disease care with this quarterly publication from the ORS.

Optometric Physician E-Journal

A weekly e-journal edited by Art Epstein, OD, featuring incisive commentary, timely research summaries and late-breaking news.

Continuing Education

October 2020 • 2.00 Credits

Antibiotics in Eye Care: A Balancing Act

September 2020 • 2.00 Credits

Corneal Dystrophies Front to Back

Additional Publications

Review of Cornea & Contact Lenses

November/December 2020

Women in Optometry

Women in Optometry - June 2020